Why would Windows re-install video driver?

wandplus

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I mean I installed a new video card in my machine. Windows 10 seems to assume I'm still using the Intel video on my CPU. So when I clicked to check if I had new updates it went ahead and downloaded and installed an Intel video driver even though I had already installed the latest Nvidia driver the same day.
 

pendragon1

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I mean I installed a new video card in my machine. Windows 10 seems to assume I'm still using the Intel video on my CPU. So when I clicked to check if I had new updates it went ahead and downloaded and installed an Intel video driver even though I had already installed the latest Nvidia driver the same day.
did you leave the igpu enabled in bios? that would be the only reason it would try to update it...
 
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bigdogchris

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It doesn't matter if you're using it or not. If the iGPU is still enabled, then it will still need a driver. Intel iGPUs and Nvidia GPUs co-exist very well, so it should not cause any issues.
Exactly right. And if this was a Mobile device you would absolutely want to have both updated because it should be using the igpu for light usage and the discrete GPU for heavy gpu apps.

You actually can do that on a desktop as well by specifying which GPU to use for which applications but it doesn't work well, at least on my system.
 

wandplus

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It doesn't matter if you're using it or not. If the iGPU is still enabled, then it will still need a driver. Intel iGPUs and Nvidia GPUs co-exist very well, so it should not cause any issues.
OK, maybe that's why there was no crash when I exited Epic Games after I updated the Intel driver. Before the update, for whatever reason, Epic Games had crashed while exiting.
 

wandplus

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I just had an idea. In the future, if I didn't want to have any issues with onboard video, are there any negative consequences to just buying a CPU with no video and a video card? (Years ago there were motherboards with no video ports anyway. But just wondering if there were modern quirks to this.)
 

GotNoRice

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I just had an idea. In the future, if I didn't want to have any issues with onboard video, are there any negative consequences to just buying a CPU with no video and a video card? (Years ago there were motherboards with no video ports anyway. But just wondering if there were modern quirks to this.)

You always have the option of using a videocard, regardless of your CPU having onboard video or not. It's rare to see motherboards these days that don't have at least one physical 16x PCIE slot. But I think you are grossly overstating the "issues" associated with onboard video; there really are none.
 

wandplus

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You always have the option of using a videocard, regardless of your CPU having onboard video or not. It's rare to see motherboards these days that don't have at least one physical 16x PCIE slot. But I think you are grossly overstating the "issues" associated with onboard video; there really are none.
Well, I think the one time I did have an issue it might have been watching videos on certain web sites. Then again, it came at a time that I hadn't updated my Nvidia driver for a long time. I imagine by the time Lunar Lake comes out I might want to build a machine then a backup machine as well which might be an AMD rig to diversify anyway. I'm tired of the corporate decisions that Intel/Nvidia makes.
 
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