Thinking about selling OM-D, next step question

sed8em

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I currently have an OM-D EM-5 with some decent lenses. I also have a Canon T1i that I hang onto to use with my telescope.
Things I don't like about the Olympus:
1) deep software menus compared to Canon. Canon is easier to adjust with little brain effort while shooting.
2) to get decent lenses compared to Canon, gotta spend a fortune. Oly's new Pro lenses are very expensive. Same with a decent portrait lens. I can buy a used 50mm 1.4 and slap it on the T1i and have a great setup. I have the 45mm 1.8 Oly, but due to the smaller m4/3 sensor I can't get great subject isolation compared to the cheaper Canon setup.

Mostly, I'm considering changing bc I have a baby on the way. I want something that I can brainlessly use and keep up with baby. From my use with the EM5, I don't think that camera is the best for that.

Eventually I would like a new body, the T1i high ISO performance sucks. Not surprising, it's almost 8 years old.
So with that in mind, should I stay with Canon? I hear good things about Nikon sensor tech.
I just hope Nikon is as easy to use as a Canon.

Edit: wow, Canon lenses are wicked expensive. Amazon prices, rebates not included
Nikon 35mm 1.8G $196
Canon 35mm f2 $600

Nikon 50mm f1.4D $334
Canon 50mm f1.8 $399
 
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sed8em

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Well, did some reading, checked out the winter sales, ended up with a Nikon D7000 kit for a good price. D7000 isn't the latest tech, but I got a good deal and it is more than enough for me.
Selling the Olympus, already have quite a few offers on it and will break even.
Found some 50mm 1.8D lenses for $70 on Fred Miranda, going to snag one of those as well.

2e6eyh0.jpg
 

UnknownSouljer

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Well, didn't even give a chance for someone else to respond. Good luck with your new gear.
 

nakedhand

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That should keep you very happy. I hope you got a very good deal, since buying old digital cameras is a lot like buying an old computer. Sensor tech advancements are still very significant between generations. You will love the 1.8 for photographing the baby indoors in bad lighting conditions.

When comparing lenses you need to do more research. The Nikon 35mm 1.8G $196
Canon 35mm f2 $600 that you put side by side are not at all in the same league in terms of ability to resolve sharply or vignette. Build is also better on the Canon. There are reasons lenses are cheap and to be frank that specific Canon lens is a wicked deal. You typically have to go to the pro line (1K and more) to get that kind of resolving power.

Here is a comparison.

Expose to the right on the histogram and adjust exposure (down) afterwards to minimize the damage you get from the D7000 poor medium high and up ISO performance. Already at ISO 800 color and luminance noise is very pronounced in lower quarters. Certainly you get better IQ than the M5! :)
 

sed8em

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That should keep you very happy. I hope you got a very good deal, since buying old digital cameras is a lot like buying an old computer. Sensor tech advancements are still very significant between generations. You will love the 1.8 for photographing the baby indoors in bad lighting conditions.

When comparing lenses you need to do more research. The Nikon 35mm 1.8G $196
Canon 35mm f2 $600 that you put side by side are not at all in the same league in terms of ability to resolve sharply or vignette. Build is also better on the Canon. There are reasons lenses are cheap and to be frank that specific Canon lens is a wicked deal. You typically have to go to the pro line (1K and more) to get that kind of resolving power.

Here is a comparison.

Expose to the right on the histogram and adjust exposure (down) afterwards to minimize the damage you get from the D7000 poor medium high and up ISO performance. Already at ISO 800 color and luminance noise is very pronounced in lower quarters. Certainly you get better IQ than the M5! :)

Thanks for the tips.
The 18-140mm lens is $500 on Amazon, and the 55-300mm is $400 on Amazon, so the way I see it I got the body for $100 brand new with two new lenses.
I liked the 18-140mm as a general lens when I only want to carry one with me and cover all ranges. The reach of the 55-300mm will be nice when going to parks and watching wildlife.
I know its not a new generation camera, but I guarantee I will always be the limiting factor to the photos it will be able to take, not the other way around.

I was pretty much dead set on selling the Olympus, I hated that menu system.
 

MN Scout

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The 50mm is long on the APS-C cameras. Feels right at home on my full frame though.

Tape your zoom ring at 50mm for a day, then try 35mm and see which you like.
 

sed8em

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I'm already liking this camera way more than the Olympus. So easy to use, having two separate dials readily accessible without even having to think about it is great. Lots of easy to push buttons to change settings rapidly, love it.
Bought a 35mm 1.8 and a 50mm 1.8.
Hoping to get either a Sigma 17-50mm OS or a Nikon 17-55mm VR before the baby is born. Probably going to have to be a used Sigma 17-50mm OS since my wife is quitting work and we're losing an income.
 

MN Scout

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I rented the 17-55 once for a wedding. It is heavy, but it focused fast and was very sharp. For family pictures, I think I would keep the 35mm prime on there all the time, or when I want zoom I'd use the 18-140 and put the camera in: Aperture Priority, Stop down 1 stop from wide open (sharper) and turn on Auto ISO. The high ISOs are so clean now, that I'd forgo the fixed F/2.8 heavy zoom.
 
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