Tesla Opens 10,000th Supercharger

rgMekanic

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It is reported that Tesla has opened it's 10,000th supercharger station, in Belleville, Ontario, Canada. The Supercharger program started in late 2012, starting with just six Superchargers in California. Very impressive, but the expansion also highlights the holes in the map even more. And don't forget the 20-40% price increase for using a Supercharger that went into effect in March. No Gen 1 Roadster support however.


It's still impractical to cross some regions using Superchargers alone (most notably Canada and significant parts of China), and availability within cities is still thin. And then there's the competition. While their growth is currently slow, they're a clear reminder that Tesla isn't the only game in town. It just has advantages in performance and sheer ubiquity that may take a long time to beat.
 
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Nolan7689

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I wouldn't recommend it, I looked into repair costs and they are astronomical right now for any paint/body work. Insurance is also crazy.
My truck has been missing it’s front corner of the bumper since Jan 2014. I think I can cheap out and ignore body work on a Tesla too.

Insurance...ehhh less so. It’s why I want to sell my 300. A piece of shit car worth half of my truck literally doubles my insurance, and that’s with multi car discounts.
 

Ultima99

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Pitiful range and you have to stop for at least a half hour every couple of hours if you do any real driving. No thanks, I'll check back in 5-10 years.
 

Heavens

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Pitiful range and you have to stop for at least a half hour every couple of hours if you do any real driving. No thanks, I'll check back in 5-10 years.

My girlfriend and I did some math and googling and we found out that when we travel from Switzerland to France (~950Km) our break interval and time fits the range and loading times of a Tesla S perfectly and there are plenty of superchargers along the way.

We might not have much endurance on long distance but ever since her father fell asleep on the road and wrecked his car we tend to stop more often, better safe than sorry.

Obviously a Tesla S is out of our league but once anyone builds on that gets real ~350Km in the 30-40k price class I'll get one.
 

Ultima99

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My girlfriend and I did some math and googling and we found out that when we travel from Switzerland to France (~950Km) our break interval and time fits the range and loading times of a Tesla S perfectly and there are plenty of superchargers along the way.

We might not have much endurance on long distance but ever since her father fell asleep on the road and wrecked his car we tend to stop more often, better safe than sorry.

Obviously a Tesla S is out of our league but once anyone builds on that gets real ~350Km in the 30-40k price class I'll get one.

Unfortunately for those that drive often for work can't make accommodations like that. My combustion engine gets me much farther and only takes 5 minutes to fill.
 

Spartacus09

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Unfortunately for those that drive often for work can't make accommodations like that. My combustion engine gets me much farther and only takes 5 minutes to fill.
I have a charging station in the parking garage at my work :), of course my job is point a/b then home to c so not doing much overall.
 

gamerk2

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Pitiful range and you have to stop for at least a half hour every couple of hours if you do any real driving. No thanks, I'll check back in 5-10 years.

Range is comparable to most autos, around 350 miles per fill up.

The idea here is that ~90% of people can charge at home, and won't really notice the recharge time as a result. For people taking longer trips, the thinking is you put superchargers at places where people would normally stop to eat anyways, so you fill up during your lunch break. The people who have the hardest time are city residents who don't have easy access to charging networks.

In any case, gas prices are heading back up toward $4/Gallon again, and you still have the longer term problem (~20 years down the road) where oil is becoming harder and harder to obtain. The transition has to happen sooner rather then later; better we start while gas is relatively cheap,

That being said, I still hold hydrogen fuel cells are a superior alternative. Electricity is winning for no other reason then no one is willing to invest in the refueling infrastructure.
 

DKS

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Tesla has partnered with Walmart in Canada for locations of their charging stations. As Walmart is a box store model, you charge your Tesla (and, so far, only Tesla - other cars won't work) in a remote part of the parking lot. Expect tent cities to be established around the charging stations. Tesla also has a very small store network in Canada. Basically, it's nonexistent outside of the largest Canadian cities. Ten stores in total in Quebec City (1), Montreal (1), Toronto (3), Calgary (2) and Vancouver (3). You break down? You call a toll free number. They made a big deal last week of a bunch of cars arriving in Toronto, just like Massey Harris used to do with the arrival of tractors and combines in the 1900's. I can't take them seriously.
 

ThatsAgood1jay

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Tesla has partnered with Walmart in Canada for locations of their charging stations. As Walmart is a box store model, you charge your Tesla (and, so far, only Tesla - other cars won't work) in a remote part of the parking lot. Expect tent cities to be established around the charging stations. Tesla also has a very small store network in Canada. Basically, it's nonexistent outside of the largest Canadian cities. Ten stores in total in Quebec City (1), Montreal (1), Toronto (3), Calgary (2) and Vancouver (3). You break down? You call a toll free number. They made a big deal last week of a bunch of cars arriving in Toronto, just like Massey Harris used to do with the arrival of tractors and combines in the 1900's. I can't take them seriously.

You can't take them seriously because they focus on the demographic (urban/suburban dwellers) most likely to actually purchase the cars?
 

DeathFromBelow

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I've been seeing more of them out on the road in Oklahoma/Texas/New Mexico.

I wish Musk all the success in the world, the industry needed a shakeup and the competition is all jelly that Musk has investors willing to let him figure out the production process. That's why you see never ending FUD about Musk/Tesla online.
 

katanaD

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thats a lot of infrastructure to be putting in place to support your product.
 

cyberguyz

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Tesla has officially inaugurated its 10000th supercharger. Located in Belleville, Ontario in Canada, the supercharger was thrown open to public use on June 9, 2018. The Tesla Supercharger will support all three models that Tesla currently offers, the entry level Model 3 sedan, the larger Model S sedan and the Model X SUV. The Tesla supercharger will also support the upcoming Tesla Roadster 2 and the recently teased Model Y Compact SUV/ crossover that is due for a public reveal sometime next year and production / delivery in 2020. The Tesla supercharger however does not support the Gen 1 Tesla Roadster.

It is good that Supercharging S3X is fully supported even in Canada!
 

Ultima99

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Range is comparable to most autos, around 350 miles per fill up.

The idea here is that ~90% of people can charge at home, and won't really notice the recharge time as a result. For people taking longer trips, the thinking is you put superchargers at places where people would normally stop to eat anyways, so you fill up during your lunch break. The people who have the hardest time are city residents who don't have easy access to charging networks.

In any case, gas prices are heading back up toward $4/Gallon again, and you still have the longer term problem (~20 years down the road) where oil is becoming harder and harder to obtain. The transition has to happen sooner rather then later; better we start while gas is relatively cheap,

That being said, I still hold hydrogen fuel cells are a superior alternative. Electricity is winning for no other reason then no one is willing to invest in the refueling infrastructure.

Google is telling me 335 for a full charge which is 75 minutes? My Camry does 430 miles per tank and fills up in less than 5.

Then there's this: https://www.citylab.com/environment...ly-cause-more-pollution-than-gas-cars/397136/

No, they're not always greener, and that doesn't take into account the batteries themselves.
 

gamerk2

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Google is telling me 335 for a full charge which is 75 minutes? My Camry does 430 miles per tank and fills up in less than 5.

Then there's this: https://www.citylab.com/environment...ly-cause-more-pollution-than-gas-cars/397136/

No, they're not always greener, and that doesn't take into account the batteries themselves.

To be fair, Camry's now get about the same gas mileage as a Prius while retaining the 16 Gallon tank. Most vehicles get ~350-400 miles, which is the same range the Model 3 gets for normal driving.

Secondly, electric vehicles are certainly cleaner over the lifetime of the vehicle, especially since the grid will be mostly renewable by the time Tesla starts selling 50k of these a year.
 

Ocellaris

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They should focus on putting cars together correct first. This is from the new “assembly line” they built inside of a steel frame tent:


The missing attention to detail is disturbing.
 

Sufu

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Google is telling me 335 for a full charge which is 75 minutes? My Camry does 430 miles per tank and fills up in less than 5.

Then there's this: https://www.citylab.com/environment...ly-cause-more-pollution-than-gas-cars/397136/

No, they're not always greener, and that doesn't take into account the batteries themselves.

These reports makes many assumptions which are all incorrect. En EV that was powered 100% by coal power plants would still be way greener than a comparable ICE vehicle.

Charging is > 95% efficient and EVs are still > 95% efficient compared to 20-30% for gasoline, not taking into account the transportation and refinement of crude oil into gasoline.

The only issue I see really stopping mass adoption is urban charging. At least in the US with the rate they've been opening chargers it gets easier to do long range travel. In time I bet charging will probably be 15min for 80% charge compared to today's 45min.
 
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