"System battery cannot be identified" warning message on bootup

peppergomez

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Well This is new to me. Laptop hasn't been moved nor has the power record. Should I open it up and reseat the battery?

It's a Dell Alienware area 51.
20221006_164215.jpg
 

peppergomez

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Much appreciated

I always use it plugged in so am I better off removing the battery in case it's faulty so that it doesn't damage the system? Assuming following your advice doesn't solve the problem.
 

pendragon1

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Much appreciated

I always use it plugged in so am I better off removing the battery in case it's faulty so that it doesn't damage the system? Assuming following your advice doesn't solve the problem.
no prob and yup
 

peppergomez

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I removed the battery I think I'm just gonna leave it out cause it looks a little swollen I always use the machine plugged in anyway
 

pendragon1

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I removed the battery I think I'm just gonna leave it out cause it looks a little swollen I always use the machine plugged in anyway
yup, its dying. if you have a ups id run off that but other than that it should be just fine.
 

peppergomez

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yup, its dying. if you have a ups id run off that but other than that it should be just fine.
Yeah I don't think it'll affect me much since I never take my laptop anywhere it's my only computer so I leave it pluged in all the time

I appreciate the help
 

GotNoRice

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Just FYI for the future, lithium-ion batteries degrade the fastest when left at 100% or 0% charge for extended periods of time. So having a laptop that is plugged in 24/7 and keeping the battery at 100% charge at all times is almost a worst-case scenario for battery longevity.

Most laptops have an option in the BIOS that will limit the battery to ~70% max charge, which is close to the ideal storage voltage (what you want the battery to be at when it's not going to be used for a while). It's why new phones and laptops are usually charged to around that level when you buy them new, so the battery doesn't degrade while sitting on the shelf. If your laptop does not have that option, then your next best bet would be to manually charge the battery to around 70% and then simply remove it from the laptop until you need it.

A lithium battery can last 20+ years if you take care of it.
 

pendragon1

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so if you do ever decide to replace it, follow his advise ^^^. your system, op, should have the battery saver option in the bios, think with dell's its 80%.
 

peppergomez

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Hey guys, update. I keep getting a startup message that a battery is required to complete a Windows firmware update. I am able to skip this and still boot up. But i keep getting prompted with it each time i startup. Can I ignore this or should I reinsert the battery for this? I'd rather not have to put it back in unless absolutely necessary.
 

pendragon1

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Hey guys, update. I keep getting a startup message that a battery is required to complete a Windows firmware update. Can I ignore this or should I reinsert the battery for this? I'd rather not have to put it back in unless absolutely necessary.
if you have it on a ups or youre confident in your power, try it, see if it will let you continue. its precautionary because if it looses power during the flash, its bricked.
 

peppergomez

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Can you clarify you're saying that you suggesting I should put the battery back in to do this for a firmware update. I'd honestly prefer not to put the battery back in at all an just continuing to use it on power.

Not sure why windows would require the battery in order to update the OS that seems weird
 

pendragon1

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Can you clarify you're saying that you suggesting I should put the battery back in to do this for a firmware update. I'd honestly prefer not to put the battery back in at all an just continuing to use it on power.

Not sure why windows would require the battery in order to update the OS that seems weird
im saying try it without but make sure your power is stable, ie on a ups. if you lose power while is flashing its bricked, aka fucked.
because its sensing youre on a laptop and is trying to prevent the above. if your battery is in and working and you lose ac power it will keep goin.
 

peppergomez

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im saying try it without but make sure your power is stable, ie on a ups. if you lose power while is flashing its bricked, aka fucked.
because its sensing youre on a laptop and is trying to prevent the above. if your battery is in and working and you lose ac power it will keep goin.
OK. I don't think I clarified that I can't do the firmware update without having a battery installed. I can only skip over that warning and boot into Windows. Sounds like I need to reinstall the battery in order to do the update. That sucks in a way. Yes, my power is stable.
 

Kardonxt

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Judging for your original error you likely won't even be able to do the install with the battery installed, since it won't be able to identify it. If that's the case your two real options are to replace the battery or try to remove the Dell BIOS update from Windows updates.
 

peppergomez

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Judging for your original error you likely won't even be able to do the install with the battery installed, since it won't be able to identify it. If that's the case your two real options are to replace the battery or try to remove the Dell BIOS update from Windows updates.
That's a very good point thank you for bringing that up OK so I'm not gonna bother with it
 
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