PSU Upgrade

captiv789

n00b
Joined
Nov 15, 2017
Messages
4
I have a XFR XTR 550w, but I want to upgrade to something with more headroom. Thinking something around 750w. Any recommendations??
 

slyxxmarbo

n00b
Joined
Aug 16, 2017
Messages
17
I have a XFR XTR 550w, but I want to upgrade to something with more headroom. Thinking something around 750w. Any recommendations??

Seasonic, Corsair and EVGA all got good deals right now, should check out newegg or amazon during black friday and cyber monday to compare
 

guitarslingerchris

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Oct 29, 2004
Messages
7,379
Kinda important. Components today are taking less power not more. When I see people buying a 1kw PSU for a typical new desktop PC I just facepalm.
My Silverstone Platinum 1500w that powers my 3770k, GTX 680 and 3 hard drives would like to pick a bone with you.
 

Web4Life

Limp Gawd
Joined
Nov 19, 2017
Messages
233
The PSU depends on what kind of hardware you want to support with it. If you are just going standard CPU, one GPU, 3-4 HDD, 4-6 Fan, some Overclocking on said CPU and GPU. Then a 750w should be plenty.

If you plan on going multi-gpu then definately aim for 850 to 1000w.

Another important matter is, how expensive is electricity in your area. If it's expensive, you want prioritize going with at least a Gold certified PSU over, let's say, a Bronze one. In the long run you will make up for the price difference through your electicity bill.
 

Archaea

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Oct 19, 2004
Messages
11,690
Kinda important. Components today are taking less power not more. When I see people buying a 1kw PSU for a typical new desktop PC I just facepalm.

There's legitimate use cases for 1K for a desktop machine.

I bought a 1000 watt PSU because I had two Fury X video cards, and an overclocked CPU. I had an older 850 watt PSU before and while it might have been okay - I didn't feel like running it at the ragged edge while gaming, mining, benchmarking.

Say 350 watts with a slight overclock on the Fury X each, or ~300 each stock, and motherboard and intel CPU can add another 150 and your up at 850 watts easily enough at full tilt.

Most folk say to keep your PSU within 80% or less of your power draw for long time use.

The same thing or more applies to a pair of AMD Vega Liquid Cooled -- easily recommend a 1000 watt PSU.
 

Archaea

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Oct 19, 2004
Messages
11,690
Original Poster.

There is a Seasonic Focus 850 watt on sale for $70 right now - that's probably about as good as they come. It has a 10 year warranty and Gold rated Efficiency.

https://slickdeals.net/f/10839339-8...-supply-69-99-ar-free-shipping?src=SiteSearch

Also you can save another $5 or $10 with a Groupon for Newegg
https://www.groupon.com/deals/newegg-4-national

If that's too much PSU and you just want a better quality unit - the little brother 650 watt Seasonic Focus is also on sale for $60 and would definitely be sufficient for most typical single GPU computers.
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?item=N82E16817151186
 

_l_

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Nov 27, 2016
Messages
1,151
yea, I have a recommendation ... look it up yourself. You can add/remove items as desired then calculate how many watts you need to use ....... PS Calculator
 

E4g1e

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
May 21, 2002
Messages
7,369
compared to what?
Here's the deal:

The values that are used in the calculations are based solely on their peak power draw and their TDP. However, today's components output far more heat than their old-generation forebears per watt consumed. As a result, the recommended minimum wattage as indicated by such a calculator would have been far higher than what those components really draw. (Anyone really need an 850W PSU for a cheap dual-core CPU with only integrated IGP?)
 

Speedeu4ia

Limp Gawd
Joined
Aug 7, 2017
Messages
392
Here's the deal:

The values that are used in the calculations are based solely on their peak power draw and their TDP. However, today's components output far more heat than their old-generation forebears per watt consumed. As a result, the recommended minimum wattage as indicated by such a calculator would have been far higher than what those components really draw. (Anyone really need an 850W PSU for a cheap dual-core CPU with only integrated IGP?)
Did you even try the calculator? Hint it doesn't say anything near the 850w, try 1/4 of that.

That calculator and at least 1 other seems to be accurate. Now Newegg calculator is drunk
 
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Tsumi

[H]F Junkie
Joined
Mar 18, 2010
Messages
13,577
Did you even try the calculator? Hint it doesn't say anything near the 850w, try 1/4 of that.

That calculator and at least 1 other seems to be accurate. Now Newegg calculator is drunk

I haven't used PSU calculators recently but historically they have been inaccurate. The inaccuracy varies depending on component selection. Getting power draw numbers from tech review sites and adding them up yourself is more accurate.
 
Joined
Jan 16, 2013
Messages
3,766
I haven't used PSU calculators recently but historically they have been inaccurate. The inaccuracy varies depending on component selection. Getting power draw numbers from tech review sites and adding them up yourself is more accurate.

I actually agree. I'd even say if you bought a new PC today (no SLI) chances are high that a 550-650W would be perfect. Also OP jumped ship and never answered your question Tsumi, guess we'll never know!
 
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