Phase change system

LstBrunnenG

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Jun 3, 2003
Messages
6,677
I'm building a system that will be using phase change cooling. Budget is not an object for this machine. For the sake of argument, let's say it's being built to go for the highest CPU-Z screenshot possible. It won't be used for gaming, so it does not need a powerful GPU or a boatload of RAM. Every component just needs to be fast.

I started by considering AMD dual-cores, AMD quad-cores, Intel Core 2 Duos, Intel Core 2 Quads, and Intel Core i7s as platforms. I've since narrowed this field to either a Core 2 Duo or a Core i7 - the Core 2 Duo has the advantage of raw clock speed (which is surprising; unlocked Core 2 Duos haven't been around since 65nm), while the Core i7 seems to have the advantage of raw performance.

Here are my proposals for each CPU:

Intel Core i7 Extreme Edition 965
Asus Rampage II Extreme X58
G.Skill PI 3 GB DDR3-2000

Intel Core 2 Duo 8600
Asus Maximus II Formula
G.Skill 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR2-1200

The PSU will be the BFG LS-550, because it has ample wattage and, according to the [H] review, phenominal voltage stability and reliability.

One thing to consider is the compatibility of the phase change unit. I'm pretty sure the Prometeia Mach II GT is the unit we'll be using, though it may soon be replaced by a multi-stage unit. As far as I know, an adapter for this unit does not exist for LGA 1336, but it does for LGA 775. If the adapter is simple, though, we could probably get the machine shop to make one.

I'm not sure whether our objective is max clock speed or max performance, which is why there are two possible systems (though it's not infeasible we'll be getting both). Given the objectives of max performance and clock frequency, are these the best components we could be using?
 

novadude

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Jul 8, 2004
Messages
1,108
You'll want to talk to someone that makes phase units and get one built/modified, and since your goal is just high clocks for apparently just shits and giggles stick with the e8600. Mounting will be easier and the p45 is a more mature chipset.
I'd look into Gigabyte p45's too.
 

LstBrunnenG

Supreme [H]ardness
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Jun 3, 2003
Messages
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The Prometeia will be a starter unit, we'll cross that bridge when we come to it.

Other than that, are both builds fundamentally sound? No glaring issues with PSU, motherboard, RAM, etc?
 

LstBrunnenG

Supreme [H]ardness
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Jun 3, 2003
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Long-term stability is an objective. However, the cooling apparatus isn't what I want help with - are these fundamentally sound components for OCing?
 

centvalny

2[H]4U
Joined
Aug 21, 2004
Messages
3,257
Imho, get a maximum wattage and efficient PSU. Its not cheap, but it will cover all the bases when comes to maximum load of a system.
 

undertheradar

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Oct 26, 2004
Messages
1,792
I would just build a compressor system myself. That way you can integrate features that the 'shelf' systems dont have... like a large passive radiator, adjustable thermostat, sensors, a larger/quieter compressor, etc. Thats what Im looking into myself. Chances are a local refrigeration company could hook you up with all you need as well... much cheaper, and your potential is much greater.
 

Mr. Baz

2[H]4U
Joined
Aug 17, 2001
Messages
2,815
I remember doing this all by hand before anyone had a prefab unit out. I was doing it for a College Physics Term project.

Had to piece everything together myself.
We used R250 and got the block (no load) to -45*F, the coldest R250 will do.
We had a problem with moisture in the system though. I also think that the cap tubing we used was WAY too small. At the time, we didn't have a proper vac pump, and our in-line drier wasn't big enough to pickup the slack.

Still, I got a 1.0GHz Athlon to hit 1.6GHz.



All the local refrigeration/HVAC companies wouldn't help me out at all unless I had an HVAC or contractor license.

So I bought stuff from www.rparts.com instead :)
 
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