No Booting To Desktop In Windows 8?

s10010001

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Ok, so I have been using Windows 8 Enterprise (Release) for about a week now. I got it on day 1 from MSDN. I got to say that I’m already used to it and it does not affect my workflow at all.

Yes, it boot straight to the metro screen, but a quick tap on the Esc key and it goes to the desktop. To tell you the truth I prefer it going to metro right away anyway because when I first login the first thing I need to do is open up a app, like Outlook. So really it saves me a click. Now, I did uninstall all the metro apps, and pinned my apps to the start menu and arranged them to my liking.

My Metro screen: https://skydrive.live.com/embed?cid...=29DA2B1531333A91!829&authkey=AFTMQGSAiZWN1Is

The search is nice too how it sorts it by Apps, Settings, and files is really intuitive compared to searching for stuff off the Windows 7 start menu that gave it all to you in a list that was as small as the start menu itself.

The only con, I think is the time it took to get the metro screen to work like I have it, it’s not something a common end user is going to pull off themselves without getting frustrated.



Its fast, everything works, I welcome metro, did I mention it fast?, hyper-v works wonderfully, it didn’t take anything away we had in Window 7 (that more than you can say about OSX and popular half brew Linux distros.)
 

heatlesssun

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The only con, I think is the time it took to get the metro screen to work like I have it, it’s not something a common end user is going to pull off themselves without getting frustrated. [/QUTOE]

Training is going to be an issue with Windows 8 but I don't think it's something that can't be done overall with say a 10 to 20 minute video tutorial and everyday use. I do think that it's important to get that 10 to 20 minutes upfront though because it does seem that a lot of people, even experienced Windows users, have a lot of bad information. In particular, though I do agree with you on Search being much better, a lot of experienced users to understand the app driven nature of Search and the Search Charm being the way that applications are Searched globally.


Its fast, everything works, I welcome metro, did I mention it fast?, hyper-v works wonderfully, it didn’t take anything away we had in Window 7 (that more than you can say about OSX and popular half brew Linux distros.)

Yeah, I do find it funny how Windows 8 will be too hard for users to pick up yet another OS that is completely software incompatible would be.
 

Monkey God

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I do think that it's important to get that 10 to 20 minutes upfront though because it does seem that a lot of people, even experienced Windows users, have a lot of bad information
Yes, it couldn't possibly be because its less than perfect, it simply has to be *bad information.*

:rolleyes:
 

Dekoth-E-

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Ok, so I have been using Windows 8 Enterprise (Release) for about a week now. I got it on day 1 from MSDN. I got to say that I’m already used to it and it does not affect my workflow at all.

Yes, it boot straight to the metro screen, but a quick tap on the Esc key and it goes to the desktop. To tell you the truth I prefer it going to metro right away anyway because when I first login the first thing I need to do is open up a app, like Outlook. So really it saves me a click. Now, I did uninstall all the metro apps, and pinned my apps to the start menu and arranged them to my liking.

My Metro screen: https://skydrive.live.com/embed?cid...=29DA2B1531333A91!829&authkey=AFTMQGSAiZWN1Is


The search is nice too how it sorts it by Apps, Settings, and files is really intuitive compared to searching for stuff off the Windows 7 start menu that gave it all to you in a list that was as small as the start menu itself.

The only con, I think is the time it took to get the metro screen to work like I have it, it’s not something a common end user is going to pull off themselves without getting frustrated.



Its fast, everything works, I welcome metro, did I mention it fast?, hyper-v works wonderfully, it didn’t take anything away we had in Window 7 (that more than you can say about OSX and popular half brew Linux distros.)

Actually that would mean it gives you an extra key click, not saves you one.

Boot straight to desktop with outlook pinned, 1 click to launch and you are already on your desktop.

Boot straight to metro, launch outlook then esc out to get to desktop is more steps.

Glad you like it, but it isn't saving you steps.


The only con, I think is the time it took to get the metro screen to work like I have it, it’s not something a common end user is going to pull off themselves without getting frustrated. [/QUTOE]

Training is going to be an issue with Windows 8 but I don't think it's something that can't be done overall with say a 10 to 20 minute video tutorial and everyday use. I do think that it's important to get that 10 to 20 minutes upfront though because it does seem that a lot of people, even experienced Windows users, have a lot of bad information. In particular, though I do agree with you on Search being much better, a lot of experienced users to understand the app driven nature of Search and the Search Charm being the way that applications are Searched globally.


Yeah, I do find it funny how Windows 8 will be too hard for users to pick up yet another OS that is completely software incompatible would be.

It isn't a matter of too hard, it is a matter of marketing. As it stands Apple has done an amazing job of marketing mac as intuitive and easy to use. This is ingrained at this point to the average user (idiot). So from their perspective they see windows as more complex and any change is just flatly unwelcome. More often than not, they view it as just a reason to move to mac and its "Always works and no viruses" belief then to relearn another MS product. Also you are woefully overestimating the abilities of the average user if you believe it will only take 20 minutes. I have trained people and it took a large percentage of the people I trained (average users), far longer than 20 minutes to master the change from XP to Vista/7 and there was hardly any change there.

The reality is simple, There is absolutely zero benefit from metro to the average user.
 

heatlesssun

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Actually that would mean it gives you an extra key click, not saves you one.

Boot straight to desktop with outlook pinned, 1 click to launch and you are already on your desktop.

Boot straight to metro, launch outlook then esc out to get to desktop is more steps.

Glad you like it, but it isn't saving you steps.

Launch Outlook from the Start Screen, one click, straight to the desktop with Outlook launched. This boot to the desktop issue is without any significance or meaning. Again, this is only at boot up. If you're booting a machine to the point where clicking to the desktop which you don't even have to do adds a lot of extra work then you're rebooting your machine way to much and that's the problem.

The reality is simple, There is absolutely zero benefit from metro to the average user.

There's lots of benefit for average users. Nice, quick and easy to install secure and safe apps with little virus or malware problems that are very power efficient for mobile devices and work with mice and keyboards and touch.
 

Dekoth-E-

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Launch Outlook from the Start Screen, one click, straight to the desktop with Outlook launched. This boot to the desktop issue is without any significance or meaning. Again, this is only at boot up. If you're booting a machine to the point where clicking to the desktop which you don't even have to do adds a lot of extra work then you're rebooting your machine way to much and that's the problem.



There's lots of benefit for average users. Nice, quick and easy to install secure and safe apps with little virus or malware problems that are very power efficient for mobile devices and work with mice and keyboards and touch.

Spin it all you want, it is one more click than I have now.

Sorry but the benefits you listed are just flat out false. Programs in win 8 are no easier or more difficult to install and no more secure than those in Win 7. Power efficiency, and function with mouse, keyboards and touch have zero to do with metro. That is built into the core of win 8 the UI has nothing to do with it. I get it, you like Win 8 but at least keep your facts straight.
 

heatlesssun

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Spin it all you want, it is one more click than I have now.

How is this spin? I took the very example that you mentioned and clearly pointed out how to do it from the Start Screen in a single click.

Sorry but the benefits you listed are just flat out false. Programs in win 8 are no easier or more difficult to install and no more secure than those in Win 7. Power efficiency, and function with mouse, keyboards and touch have zero to do with metro. That is built into the core of win 8 the UI has nothing to do with it. I get it, you like Win 8 but at least keep your facts straight.

Windows 8 apps are much easier to install and inherently safer as they don't ever need elevated privileges to run or install and don't have external dependencies. Power efficiency is at the very heart of Metro. If you've studied anything about developing for it you'd know that, it's at the core of so much.
 

Void

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Linux is going to be super popular now.
Mostly to those that are already using it. Those that aren't willing to learn how to use a completely new, to them, OS will just wait till Windows 9 while still using what they have. Not everyone upgrades every time a new OS comes out ;).
Also why would an operating system that is much harder to use for the average person become more popular than the one they are already using? Your comment makes no sense to me. :confused:

If anything were to happen then it would be Mac's that would become even more popular because of this, but even that's a far fetched idea. If MS releasing OS like ME and Vista didn't hurt them much then I can't see Windows 8 doing much, if any, damage to them. Now if this trend were to continue across multiple OS releases then yea people might start looking to move away in droves.
 

s10010001

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Spin it all you want, it is one more click than I have now.

Sorry but the benefits you listed are just flat out false. Programs in win 8 are no easier or more difficult to install and no more secure than those in Win 7. Power efficiency, and function with mouse, keyboards and touch have zero to do with metro. That is built into the core of win 8 the UI has nothing to do with it. I get it, you like Win 8 but at least keep your facts straight.

lol its not a extra click. Its the same. Boot to metro, Click outlook, it automatically goes to desktop and open outlook.
 

4saken

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If you have multiple monitors its all a moot point anyway imo.
 

s10010001

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Linux is going to be super popular now.

lol, if a user cant figure out how to use something as simple as metro, how are they going to use Linux. They will get stuck at lvm setup and never even get it installed.

OSX on the otherhand, will probably win people over. However with laptops starting at 1k, it will be less than you think. learning metro will just happen.
 

heatlesssun

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lol, if a user cant figure out how to use something as simple as metro, how are they going to use Linux. They will get stuck at lvm setup and never even get it installed.

OSX on the otherhand, will probably win people over. However with laptops starting at 1k, it will be less than you think. learning metro will just happen.

But don't forget that none of those fancy Macs are going to have touch screens at any price. New hardware is one thing that people seem to gloss over with Windows 8.
 

naninani

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Just started giving the Windows 8 Enterprise evaluation a go. The "GUI formerly known as Metro" takes some getting used to, but it's not bad per se... just not really optimal for K+M.
 

Ur_Mom

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But don't forget that none of those fancy Macs are going to have touch screens at any price. New hardware is one thing that people seem to gloss over with Windows 8.

I don't think they are glossing over it. They just don't see a need for a touchscreen desktop. For me, I upgraded from Windows 7. My next monitor will be a 30". NON-Touchscreen. I don't have any need for a touchscreen interface on the desktop.

For touch, I'm staying with tablets with iPad and Surface and use them daily. Well, the iPad. Haven't bought the Surface yet. :D

But, for most, they are going to use their desktop the way they currently do: with a mouse and keyboard. Even with a gesture mouse, it's not a perfect UI for desktop use. I find myself among the majority here. Using the desktop for creating content using a mouse and keyboard. I'm typing most of the time. I couldn't pay a $200 premium for a touchscreen monitor when I'd never use it.

So, new hardware for Windows 8 doesn't mean much on the desktop. It matters greatly on portable devices, though.
 

soulman901

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I don't like Microsoft's attitude towards the desktop. They need to add a Start Button and allow people to go straight to the desktop. If they want people to use this for Businesses, they need to do it.
 

heatlesssun

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So, new hardware for Windows 8 doesn't mean much on the desktop. It matters greatly on portable devices, though.

I agree, and even now most PCs sold are laptops and tablets will outsell desktops this year. So as much as one may hate Windows 8 Microsoft is targeting the growth markets.

As much as I do think touch is great on mobile devices I too don't think highly of it on a desktop but I probably will pick up a large touch screen monitor or two in the coming months just to become familiar with the experience. Oddly enough a lot of Windows all-in-ones have incorporated touch for a while now, there's a lot more of them in retail that touch screen laptops.
 
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