Is MS Win Server software tied to hardware?

dvsman

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So I can get an old server from my office to putt around / learn on but I think the thing (Dell PowerXYZ 2600) ran on SB Server 2003 and it's only going to come with the hardware, no docs or drives.

I know 2003 is way out of date but if licensing it was free / cheap, I'd give it a shot. Could I still get license (s) for it? Would it be more expensive to do than it's worth?

If only old Technet was still around / #RIP
 

AltTabbins

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Just running those old Poweredge 2600's is probably not worth it. They are really loud, hot, and very power hungry. You can usually check dells site with the service tag to see what they were licensed for at purchase. Most people/companies buy their licence with the server, I'd ask your IT team that is giving it to you if you can use it. I doubt they are using server 2003 anymore, but its always good to check.
 

Biznatch

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No, if you aren't getting the license key with the server, you'll have to purchase your own.
 

bigdogchris

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Server OS'es are no different than desktop. OEM licensing is going to be tied to the hardware while Retail licensing can be transferred.

For example, you can't take a Dell OEM Server 2003 license and transfer it to HP. But if you bought the server licensing from CDW then you can.
 

Biznatch

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Server OS'es are no different than desktop. OEM licensing is going to be tied to the hardware while Retail licensing can be transferred.

For example, you can't take a Dell OEM Server 2003 license and transfer it to HP. But if you bought the server licensing from CDW then you can.


It's not like newer systems where the key is embedded in the bios. If he is not given the license key as part of the sale, he will not be able to install server.
 

FNtastic

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Unless you have an absolute need to purchase the actual hardware, run VirtualBox on your existing computer. You can install any OS you want on it and learn everything you ever wanted. Plus, you'll learn more about virtualization than you would by installing an OS on a bare bones server.
 

B00nie

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Unless you have an absolute need to purchase the actual hardware, run VirtualBox on your existing computer. You can install any OS you want on it and learn everything you ever wanted. Plus, you'll learn more about virtualization than you would by installing an OS on a bare bones server.
But virtualbox is not going to teach you how to set up and service the hardware. Just initializing the drives, building the raid packs etc. are totally different from desktop computing so if he aims to work in the tech an actual server is much better for learning. Plus nothing stops you from virtualizing the old server, just set up a linux host and libvirtd/virtman, proxmox, vmware or some other host.

And let's face it, nothing is sweeter than sitting next to an old server that has 8000rpm fans blowing 24/7 :D
 

FNtastic

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But virtualbox is not going to teach you how to set up and service the hardware. Just initializing the drives, building the raid packs etc. are totally different from desktop computing so if he aims to work in the tech an actual server is much better for learning. Plus nothing stops you from virtualizing the old server, just set up a linux host and libvirtd/virtman, proxmox, vmware or some other host.

And let's face it, nothing is sweeter than sitting next to an old server that has 8000rpm fans blowing 24/7 :D
Just make sure you brought your ear muffs :D

I've long ago graduated from physical hardware. So, admittedly a bit biased. I mean, it's still hard to justify the upfront cost, power bill, and noise complaint waivers from the neighbors. To learn how to select "raid 5" and physically plug in an ethernet cable to two ports and bond the ports just isn't worth it in my opinion... Depends on exactly what the goals are. If you want to work in a datacenter, or plan to be maintaining server hardware somehow, sure. Otherwise, go the virtualized route
 
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