I microwaved a R9 390X gaming and now my pc won't run after 3rd time

jeffreyp

n00b
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
Messages
17
1 Microwaved graphics card for few minutes, because it has the overheating issues.
2 Plastic around pins were melted and some plugs around interface sockets, the metal part, had some burning coming out.
3 Removed the graphics card, installed it, failed to show anything on the display at all.
4 3rd time PC won't even turn on as in power. The ethernet LED was lit.
4 Tried that again with unplugging cables and having one RAM only in the PC and only the main SSD
5 Now the PC won't turn on at all, ethernet LED is not turning on.
6 tried couple of tricks from the internet to turn it on like have a screw driver on both power switch pins but nothing happthis is a spoof right.
1 Microwaved graphics card for few minutes, because it has the overheating issues.
2 Plastic around pins were melted and some plugs around interface sockets, the metal part, had some burning coming out.
3 Removed the graphics card, installed it, failed to show anything on the display at all.
4 3rd time PC won't even turn on as in power. The ethernet LED was lit.
4 Tried that again with unplugging cables and having one RAM only in the PC and only the main SSD
5 Now the PC won't turn on at all, ethernet LED is not turning on.
6 tried couple of tricks from the internet to turn it on like have a screw driver on both power switch pins but nothing happens.
7 HELP !!!
This is a spoof I hope. If not, never in your lifetime ever try to to repair a Gawd damn thing. The world will thank you for it. Love Putin.
 

Spirit_Retro

Limp Gawd
Joined
Apr 1, 2010
Messages
362
Hand write it with number 1 pencil. Fold up the paper and microwave on high for at least 30 seconds. ;-)

No... you trace the design with a sharpie on tinfloil. Crumple into a ball. Inject the ball heavily with GE Silicon and microwave for 10 minutes.

The ball expands and eventually lays out flat with the aluminum foil adhered to a flat silicon sheet. One it cools you remove the sheet, slowly separate the foil from the silicon sheet, and the traces you created with the sharpie magically remain.

If you want to use the method for an integrated circuit you simply need to affix the components to the sheet using small tweezers and a microscope, in the appropriate positions of course, before crumpling the medium into a "Quantum Ball-Grid Array". The components will be properly positioned and affixed via the "Thermal Un-Balling Process" .

Once the product has been balled and un-balled. You test for binning.

That's how TSMC makes their electronics. And you can too.
 
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