Hyper-V Quick Create Feature Makes Creating Ubuntu Virtual Machines Easier

cageymaru

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Microsoft has collaborated with Canonical to make running Linux even easier on Windows 10. The Hyper-V Quick Create command in the upcoming Fall Creator's Update will feature a virtual machine image that can be launched by typing "Hyper-V Quick Create" in your start menu. In addition to the easier VM functionality, you can use the Windows Subsystem for Linux.

Today we're very pleased to announce that an optimised Ubuntu Desktop image is available from the Hyper-V gallery. This will give an optimum experience when running Ubuntu Desktop as a guest on a Windows 10 Pro desktop host. From the Ubuntu Report data we know that a lot of people are using Ubuntu as a virtual machine, and so we want to make that experience as seamless as possible.
 

clockdogg

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Sweeeet! Now even Linux can send big fat telemetry packets home for Xmas (and every other day). Embrace and extend - privacy violation innovation.
 

DukenukemX

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Now if Microsoft can work with Canonical to get windows 10 working as a guest and Ubuntu as the host, that would be great. As the great Wendell from Level1techs has said, Windows should be in a VM where it belongs.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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Now if Microsoft can work with Canonical to get windows 10 working as a guest and Ubuntu as the host, that would be great. As the great Wendell from Level1techs has said, Windows should be in a VM where it belongs.

Since when has Windows 10 not worked as a guest under Ubuntu?

I use a Windows 10 Pro VM via Virtualbox on my Linux Mint desktop at home all the time.

If I need to I can spin one up in a guest on my Proxmox (KVM) server as well.

It requires install from Windows 10 media, which can be a pain, but it definitely works.
 

DukenukemX

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Since when has Windows 10 not worked as a guest under Ubuntu?

I use a Windows 10 Pro VM via Virtualbox on my Linux Mint desktop at home all the time.

If I need to I can spin one up in a guest on my Proxmox (KVM) server as well.

It requires install from Windows 10 media, which can be a pain, but it definitely works.
I do too, but it would be nice if running Windows 10 in a VM built into Ubuntu instead of installing something like VMware or VirtualBox.
 

andrewaggb

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I use ubuntu virtual machines in hyper-v all the time. never had an issue. I suspect this is literally just saving you a couple steps. I keep waiting for an official microsoft branded and supported version of linux that works well within the domain and has an easy setup/install/management etc, probably based on debian, with a price tag similar to windows server.
 

Mega6

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If you have the cash, been using VMware Workstation for years. Works great. Pretty much the same thing as W10 HyperV with a much better GUI and more granularity. Your downloading the ubuntu 18.4 LTS right now and its 1.49GB. You will need to enable Hyper-V in turn windows features on or off.
 

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BloodyIron

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It already runs just fine in a Linux powered VM

Now if Microsoft can work with Canonical to get windows 10 working as a guest and Ubuntu as the host, that would be great. As the great Wendell from Level1techs has said, Windows should be in a VM where it belongs.
 

BloodyIron

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I have yet to see a real reason to pay for A type 2 hypervisor. Virtual box gets you any feature you could want for free.

And if you need actually type 1 features, use proxmox. All the features without the expensive licensing model ;)

If you have the cash, been using VMware Workstation for years. Works great. Pretty much the same thing as W10 HyperV with a much better GUI and more granularity. Your downloading the ubuntu 18.4 LTS right now and its 1.49GB. You will need to enable Hyper-V in turn windows features on or off.
 

Mega6

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I have yet to see a real reason to pay for A type 2 hypervisor. Virtual box gets you any feature you could want for free.

And if you need actually type 1 features, use proxmox. All the features without the expensive licensing model ;)
free is good, used virtualbox on linux. better answer.
 

heatlesssun

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I feel like this is doing it backwards.

I'd much rather have Linux be my host, and run any Microsoft OS:es as guests should I need to, than the other way around.

Depends on the device. I doubt most would want to use a Linux distro as the host on a 2 in 1 device or touch capable device if they actually used those features.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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I have yet to see a real reason to pay for A type 2 hypervisor. Virtual box gets you any feature you could want for free.

And if you need actually type 1 features, use proxmox. All the features without the expensive licensing model ;)


Well, to be fair, if you want access to the latest enterprise stable tested repository, you need to have a license for Proxmox.

The community edition is free though.
 

Lakados

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From the documentation it looks like this is the long promised integration of Linux when paired with the Windows Subsystem for Linux, when you install this VM it mounts the PC drives into the Linux distro and vice versa. If I am understanding this it should let you run all your favourite Linux programs or commands from power shell. I can see this being moderately useful.
 

B00nie

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I have yet to see a real reason to pay for A type 2 hypervisor. Virtual box gets you any feature you could want for free.

And if you need actually type 1 features, use proxmox. All the features without the expensive licensing model ;)
Virtualbox is buggy at least on OSX. Then again you have to pay again for Parallels every other time the OS updates, which is annoying.
 

BloodyIron

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I've been using the "community" branch for over 5 years. Stability is not a problem. What you really get from the paid subscription is support, but there is the additional testing for packages in the stable branch.

And when I mean 5 years, I mean, cluster with 20+ VMs for that time.

Well, to be fair, if you want access to the latest enterprise stable tested repository, you need to have a license for Proxmox.

The community edition is free though.
 

Zarathustra[H]

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I've been using the "community" branch for over 5 years. Stability is not a problem. What you really get from the paid subscription is support, but there is the additional testing for packages in the stable branch.

And when I mean 5 years, I mean, cluster with 20+ VMs for that time.

Hmm. I've been using the paid community license, but I have been balking at its rather steep cost lately.

In particular it annoys me that my license for dual hexacores is costing me double what the license would cost for a single 32 core Epyc... So the way to get a good license deal is to drop thousands on the latest hardware, where my eBay specials I chose for cost savings wind up costing me more in license fees :/

If the community repositories are that stable, maybe I can justify just passing on the license.

My system is not a production system per se, but I run a lot of stuff on it that my house depends on, so unreliability is not an option. I like to refer to it as "home production"
 

BloodyIron

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If the scope is residential, the "community" edition is extremely reliable. Seriously.

It's really stable enough for production, but I like supporting the devs, so I recommend that where possible.

Seriously, the development over the years has been fucking stellar. It just does stuff so much better than the alternatives.

Hmm. I've been using the paid community license, but I have been balking at its rather steep cost lately.

In particular it annoys me that my license for dual hexacores is costing me double what the license would cost for a single 32 core Epyc... So the way to get a good license deal is to drop thousands on the latest hardware, where my eBay specials I chose for cost savings wind up costing me more in license fees :/

If the community repositories are that stable, maybe I can justify just passing on the license.

My system is not a production system per se, but I run a lot of stuff on it that my house depends on, so unreliability is not an option. I like to refer to it as "home production"
 

Zarathustra[H]

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If the scope is residential, the "community" edition is extremely reliable. Seriously.

It's really stable enough for production, but I like supporting the devs, so I recommend that where possible.

Seriously, the development over the years has been fucking stellar. It just does stuff so much better than the alternatives.


Hmm,

Thanks for that info.

My subscription expired a couple of weeks ago. I've meant to re-up, but now I may have to read about what I need to do to switch back to the community sources again. I can't remember what I did the first time.

Edit /etc/apt/sources.d?
 

BloodyIron

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I'm not familiar with that process, sorry. But I suspect it isn't hard.

Hmm,

Thanks for that info.

My subscription expired a couple of weeks ago. I've meant to re-up, but now I may have to read about what I need to do to switch back to the community sources again. I can't remember what I did the first time.

Edit /etc/apt/sources.d?
 
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