How to set security settings for multiple files

Joined
Apr 22, 2015
Messages
594
I have a drive with a folder called movies. There are 200 files there, and I can't see them on my internal shared network until I add "everyone" to the security level of each file. I tried to do it with the folder, but that did not work as that object "everyone" is already there in the folder properties, so it does not carry over to any new files that are added. I have some files with "everyone" already added from the past that share just fine. I also tried by selecting several files then properties, but there is no option for security. These were new recently added files from a couple of years ago.

Any ideas how I can change these by adding "everyone" to the security properties?

Here is what I've been doing for each file separately:
Select file
Right click - properties
Select security tab
Click edit
Click add
Click advance
Click find now
Select "everyone" from the list

then clicking ok on each window to exit and save.
 

chameleoneel

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Aug 15, 2005
Messages
6,103
I have a drive with a folder called movies. There are 200 files there, and I can't see them on my internal shared network until I add "everyone" to the security level of each file. I tried to do it with the folder, but that did not work as that object "everyone" is already there in the folder properties, so it does not carry over to any new files that are added. I have some files with "everyone" already added from the past that share just fine. I also tried by selecting several files then properties, but there is no option for security. These were new recently added files from a couple of years ago.

Any ideas how I can change these by adding "everyone" to the security properties?

Here is what I've been doing for each file separately:
Select file
Right click - properties
Select security tab
Click edit
Click add
Click advance
Click find now
Select "everyone" from the list

then clicking ok on each window to exit and save.
In the security settings for the folder, there should be an option to inherit the folders permissions to all child objects/folders. Which means, everything inside of the folder will inherit the permissions from the folder.
 

SamirD

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Mar 22, 2015
Messages
5,726
This is why I hate NTFS and use FAT32 for shares since it doesn't have such granular permissions.
 

BlueLineSwinger

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Dec 1, 2011
Messages
1,250
This is why I hate NTFS and use FAT32 for shares since it doesn't have such granular permissions.

Trying to get Windows file permissions to behave in any kind of rational, consistent manner is one of the reasons I hate Windows.
 

SamirD

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Mar 22, 2015
Messages
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Trying to get Windows file permissions to behave in any kind of rational, consistent manner is one of the reasons I hate Windows.
Use FAT32 instead so you don't have to worry about file by file permissions or any usergroup based permissions. Because FAT32 is based on FAT, it simply doesn't have the capability so a share is very KISS simple.
 
Joined
Apr 22, 2015
Messages
594
Thanks for the info. I got all the files fixed with "everyone" object added, but what if I add new files in that folder? Will the credentials carry over?
 

BlueLineSwinger

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Dec 1, 2011
Messages
1,250
Use FAT32 instead so you don't have to worry about file by file permissions or any usergroup based permissions. Because FAT32 is based on FAT, it simply doesn't have the capability so a share is very KISS simple.

Feasible for separate volumes, but then you lose some of the advantages of NTFS. exFAT gets around the file/volume size limits, but still lacks modern features like journaling, encryption, etc.

I've never checked, but is it even possible to install modern Windows to anything but NTFS (i.e., UEFI/GPT compatibility)?
 

SamirD

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Mar 22, 2015
Messages
5,726
Feasible for separate volumes, but then you lose some of the advantages of NTFS. exFAT gets around the file/volume size limits, but still lacks modern features like journaling, encryption, etc.

I've never checked, but is it even possible to install modern Windows to anything but NTFS (i.e., UEFI/GPT compatibility)?
Advantages like file permissions that are a pita? :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:

Boot drives have to be NTFS, but storage volumes can be FAT32.
 
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