How often do you replace power supply?

Tsumi

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Adapters to make ATX power supplies work with 12VO wouldn't be terribly difficult. The only gotcha on 12VO is the +12vsb rail, which no ATX PSU will have. Ideally, this could be worked around by hanging a boost converter off the +5vsb rail, but 12vsb is rated for 1.5A, which is far too much to be pulling from +5vsb. To get around this, you can use an external wall wart, or an internally mounted 12v supply for the 12vsb rail.

I could see early 12VO motherboards coming with a dongle to connect to the +5vsb and disabling whatever runs off the +12vsb or putting power limits on.

DIY builds are niche and don't get much attention for sure, but sooner or later the regulations will trickle down.
 

trasixes

Gawd
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Really depends on the age of the PSU for me. If it's 8-10 years old, and I'm doing a new build, or major overhaul, I'll usually replace it. This is mostly paranoia, but I've seen some really awful crap happen when a PSU dies (took a motherboard, and 2 hard drives with it). Only time I've seen or heard of it happening within my circle of friends/family. I realize it's unlikely to happen, but 'an ounce of prevention' is my philosophy.
 

Unabomber

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I don't really replace it, but send it down the line for a lesser system when I do an upgrade.

Right now, the system at home is using a Seasonic M12 620 unit, and had previously been using an Antec Truepower Trio 650 for about 7 years, and the Truepower Trio had been used for another 4 years before that. That Truepower Trio is still in operation, but now moved to my work PC running the ol' FX 4100. The old FX 4100's XClio Goodpower 500 W unit was handed down to the A8-3850 work PC, and I suspect it's going to die any day now. Right now, I still have a Topower 600 W unit sitting idly, as a backup just in case if any of the units fail.

I figure if I get a good power supply, then I should be able to get at least 10 years of solid use out of it. My oldest power supply still in operation is a 13 year old Corsair HX620 that's powering up one of the workstations in the lab, and still measuring good stable voltages.

That power supply the OP mentioned looks to be plenty.
 

GiGaBiTe

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Really depends on the age of the PSU for me. If it's 8-10 years old, and I'm doing a new build, or major overhaul, I'll usually replace it. This is mostly paranoia, but I've seen some really awful crap happen when a PSU dies (took a motherboard, and 2 hard drives with it). Only time I've seen or heard of it happening within my circle of friends/family. I realize it's unlikely to happen, but 'an ounce of prevention' is my philosophy.

Usually what causes old PSUs to fail in catastrophic fashion is one of the capacitors going open/short/high ESR/electrically leaky, which stresses components both upstream and downstream from them that triggers the big bang and causes carnage.

I've seen it happen too many times to count, but it's usually the small inconsequential looking capacitors wedged between transformers and under heatsinks that cause the catastrophic failures. The bigger output filtering caps going bad usually just cause regulation issues. The main line caps going bad (the big fat ones on the primary side) can cause near immediate failure of the switching mosfets though.

One example of total destruction I can remember in recent years was some tiny cap on the secondary side responsible for a bit of regulation circuitry on an LCD television. It failed, caused the regulation chip it was powering to fail, which shorted out the secondary side transistors, which in turn blew up the primary side push pull mosfets from excessive current draw, which in turn blew a crater in the PWM IC, and all of that caused the bridge rectifier to forcibly detonate and blow a hole clean through the PCB. The charring then allowed electricity still flowing to start arcing across the PCB and burn it. Did I mention the fuse was fine when it came to me? I guess it blew the breaker for whoever owned it before I got it.

But long story short, old PSUs can be kept in service by recapping them every 5-7 years, and longer if the PSU is infrequently used after that.
 

trasixes

Gawd
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896
Usually what causes old PSUs to fail in catastrophic fashion is one of the capacitors going open/short/high ESR/electrically leaky, which stresses components both upstream and downstream from them that triggers the big bang and causes carnage.

I've seen it happen too many times to count, but it's usually the small inconsequential looking capacitors wedged between transformers and under heatsinks that cause the catastrophic failures. The bigger output filtering caps going bad usually just cause regulation issues. The main line caps going bad (the big fat ones on the primary side) can cause near immediate failure of the switching mosfets though.

One example of total destruction I can remember in recent years was some tiny cap on the secondary side responsible for a bit of regulation circuitry on an LCD television. It failed, caused the regulation chip it was powering to fail, which shorted out the secondary side transistors, which in turn blew up the primary side push pull mosfets from excessive current draw, which in turn blew a crater in the PWM IC, and all of that caused the bridge rectifier to forcibly detonate and blow a hole clean through the PCB. The charring then allowed electricity still flowing to start arcing across the PCB and burn it. Did I mention the fuse was fine when it came to me? I guess it blew the breaker for whoever owned it before I got it.

But long story short, old PSUs can be kept in service by recapping them every 5-7 years, and longer if the PSU is infrequently used after that.

Good info, and absolutely true. In fact, in most of my electronic failures a capacitor has been the culprit, and the device several years old. Most recently was a monitor with cheap capacitors - replaced and it's still working fine. These days, I'll typically just replace whatever it is that isn't working due to time constraints with work/family.
 

Teenyman45

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When it dies early in the warranty period due to a manufacturing defect or when the replacement computer hardware has even a slim chance of exceeding what the PSU can comfortably power. Otherwise, by buying well reviewed PSU's known for reliability and doing some periodic dusting maintenance along with keeping it ventilated and cool, it's not uncommon for me to get a decade plus out of the unit.

The only brand I've ever had a problem with is Corsair.
 

silentsod

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This morning when I found out it was toast in my machine. It was a Corsair that had a 6-7 year run. Slapped in the EVGA low end PSU I got with a bundle and had lying around. I'm not really comfortable with a 700W powering the 3080ti so I may be in the market for a new one.
 

ea6b123

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Id say even though its still rocking after great yrs get a new one NOTHING lasts forever..Seasonic is my Choice also :)
 

AVATARAT

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I replace my Seasonic FX 850W with NZXT C850, 850W 80+ Gold (Seasonic too) because I had problems with overclocking and sometimes restarts on my RX 6700 XT.
The card can't run on PCI-E 4.0 but on 3.0 never mind what I did but after I change the PSU it automatically jumps on 4.0.
Now I can run without problem +20W on max TDP (through vbios).

I just want to mention it, there is enough info on the Internet about some old (few years) PUSs that have this or a similar problem.
 

Whach

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Still using my CorsairAX850 from 2011. I think it’s a seasonic make. They seem to be the psu standard.
 

Captain Newmackwa

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Since the 2000's when I purchase a PSU, I get the highest quality PSU available and intentionally oversized the capacity by 100-200W than what I actually need to make it last as long as possible. I'll only replace it if it breaks down but in the two instances when that happened, the PSUs were still under warranty so I just had them RMA'd and the manufacturer usually sends me a newer equivalent model.
 

funkydmunky

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Ya lots of good points in the thread. Thinking we should all be able for proper testing of when a PS goes wonk. And that should be tested often!
Think about it. A faulty PS can make virtually every component look faulty even when it is not.
Hmmmm?
 

Kiriakos-GR

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I always have a spare power supply to keep around for troubleshooting. You can save a heap of chasing your tail during unknown troubleshooting times. Replaced mine after 10 years & it was still working fine but did it preemptively to not suffer with a dead power supply if it were to fail anytime after 10 years.
I think my HIPER 780W worth the world record, technology of 2008 this demonstrated issues at December 2020, I did replace two damaged capacitors, only an single volts rail had an issue, all others rails were better than new.
But I made and another discovery, Corsair CX750 technology of 2013, this using lesser energy from the wall plug about anything.

HIPER 780W (system powered off (soft off) 2.8~3.0W
Corsair CX750 (system powered off (soft off) 0.8~1.0W

HIPER 780W (system idle ) 137W
Corsair CX750 (system idle) 130W ( 230V)

I am in to professional electronic repairs, certified and all, I think now that anything quality made at 2008 and later, it does qualify to be repaired by an expert.
How to know if your PSU qualify be repaired? Well I never shopped for my system a PSU with lower retail price of 135~140 Euro.
 
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I'm actually thinking about reusing my psu (about 10yrs+) for another build. Never had issues with it and don't overclock or do anything crazy.
 

Nenu

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I'm actually thinking about reusing my psu (about 10yrs+) for another build. Never had issues with it and don't overclock or do anything crazy.

Whether this is sensible depends very much (on who made it and) the build quality, although its unlikely a crap PSU would have lasted this long, its possible and wouldnt be sensible to tempt fate.
I dont disagree with you if its a good PSU. I'm using a 10.5 yr old Corsair (Seasonic design) that was run 24/7, in a 450W 3090 build which has worked without a flaw for over a year, overclocks and all.
 

Kiriakos-GR

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If the price is right and its a significant upgrade in efficiency.
Marketing played allot with the word efficiency these two decade's.
They are out there IEC standards which they get updated every few years, past decade minimum acceptable PSU Soft-off consumption this was 1W, recent made PSU are now at 0.5W or less.
Non of the two, they will burn your wallet regarding wasted energy.
Long story in sort, PSU development this is at it end, there is nothing extraordinary or magical to be developed in the future.
 

blackmomba

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Honestly I hope they at least develop some damn standard for modular cables at the very least

Some racket they got going there

Cable Type X for PSU X, type Y for PSU Y, type Z for PSU X++, all look identical. Jesus just figure something out already

I bet the whole industry laughs at suckers like me sitting there with a multimeter testing pins on modern equipment that should just work

I don't wanna toss away bundles of wires just cause I didn't label them 5 years ago and don't have time to test them individually

Real racket I'm telling you
 

GotNoRice

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Honestly I hope they at least develop some damn standard for modular cables at the very least

Some racket they got going there

Cable Type X for PSU X, type Y for PSU Y, type Z for PSU X++, all look identical. Jesus just figure something out already

I bet the whole industry laughs at suckers like me sitting there with a multimeter testing pins on modern equipment that should just work

I don't wanna toss away bundles of wires just cause I didn't label them 5 years ago and don't have time to test them individually

Real racket I'm telling you

I'm pretty sure that they are happy with the status quo in that regard. People only use the modular cables that they need and then lose/misplace/throw-away the rest. Then when they upgrade their computer or do a new build years later they can't locate the other modular cables and they end up having to buy a new PSU - planned obsolescence working as intended.

In my case at least, I almost always keep the original boxes for computer parts so I can potentially re-sell them for more later on. I keep any extra parts/cables in the box also, so zero chance of them getting lost. If you are just tossing the extra modular cables into your big bin of random cables or whatever... well maybe you shouldn't. Even better, just buy a non-modular PSU and simply tuck your extra cables cleanly behind the motherboard tray.
 

Kiriakos-GR

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Honestly I hope they at least develop some damn standard for modular cables at the very least

Too bud that the actual responsible for all those bad designed fashions, they do not read our posts.
I wish to kick in the ass, the one having the idea (using all cables black) especially ta PCI-E harness. ( whom will understand polarity ?) .
This is true plug and pray.
 

Kiriakos-GR

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If you think this is the case, you should look at GANfets
This is technology developed for other electrical applications.
Always keep in mind, that an computer PSU this is in fixed dimensions.

Gaming style PC case vs ATX case (PSU at the top), this gained some traction because of slightly longer (1000~1200W) PSU.
If you are not restricted by product dimensions as engineer, then the development this is neither restricted.
 

Keljian

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This is technology developed for other electrical applications.
Always keep in mind, that an computer PSU this is in fixed dimensions.

Gaming style PC case vs ATX case (PSU at the top), this gained some traction because of slightly longer (1000~1200W) PSU.
If you are not restricted by product dimensions as engineer, then the development this is neither restricted.
I’m not thinking size, I am thinking efficiency
 

wtfnub

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I replace mine every 3-5 years when I do a completely new pc build, I’m using a ax1600i at the moment which corsair gave me for free 🤟🏻
 

WilyKit

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My trick is to get a power supply that is 3 times my max power usage and put a dedicated fan on it to keep the components at ambient temps where the components are rated to last the longest. Had my 1200w Corsair unit since 2013 and still going strong. It’s an AXi unit so I can real time monitor the voltages and it’s still dead on 8 years later.
I have a TX750 from 2007 that's still going strong, no extra tricks to get it this far. Pretty sure all you're doing is putting more dust in there.
 

pendragon1

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apparently about ever 6 years, mine popped last night. so thats two since 2011. thankfully everything is ok and i had a spare.
edit: what ever happened that night also took out my microwave(fuse blew) and a friends wireless ap(3 blocks away), think there was a surge or series of brown outs in the area.
 
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DaeviousMax

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I have a TX750 from 2007 that's still going strong, no extra tricks to get it this far. Pretty sure all you're doing is putting more dust in there.
Nope I run a sealed positive air pressure system with ultra fine mesh filters. Visually checked my psu and the internals still look shiny and new 9 years later. Plus look up the component data sheets for the capacitors, mosfets, etc. and you will see that their lifespan is inversely correlated to increasing temperature. I’m glad your psu is doing fine on its own though!
 

zpackrat

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Well I'm still using a 20+ year old PowerMan 250 Watt PSU that powered my first build in my retro rig. Opened and inspected occasionally due to age for bulging/leaking caps. I've checked it on the MM a few times and the 3.3 and 5 volt rails are still strong as is the 12 volt. The fan has been replaced of course.
 

AmongTheChosenX

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I've been running a Cooler Master 650w in my i7-3770k rig for quite literally 10 years now and it's still working... I don't know how, or why, but god damn it's a hell of a unit. Think I only like $80 for it used on this site actually
 

Elledan

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Got the Seasonic 660p running since 2015 in the same 6700K rig I built it into originally with zero issues.

Pretty sure I have never replaced a PSU, only repurposed them. When PSUs often come with warranties ranging from 8-12 years, that tends to be enough time for it to firmly obsolete the PSU by the time the warranty has well and truly run out. Heck, I'm still using OEM PSUs in some low-end rigs which my work threw out because of minor issues like coil whine.
 

3dprophet

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On my 13 year old Corsair VX550 the plastic on the SATA connectors has become brittle and started snapping.
 
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