gsync will make my 144hz monitor a 60hz monitor playing at 60fps?

raknarius

n00b
Joined
Dec 29, 2013
Messages
29
ok ill be single carding my games, 770gtx, most my framerates will be around 60-70fps.

now ive heard the smoothness on a 120hz or 144hz monitor is still an advantage at those fps. so I was going to get one of those, then im told gsync is a new tec coming out that will improve gameplay. but im reading it basicly adjusts your monitor to the hz of the framerates so my 120hz monitor will effectively be a 60-70hz monitor. so my question is. what will be better gaming experience, playing 60fps on a 144hz monitor without gsync. or say gsync on a 60hz monitor playing at 60fps.
 

Yikes2000

Limp Gawd
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Jul 16, 2007
Messages
226
G-Sync at 60Hz is not the same as normal 60Hz monitor. Every one of those 60 frames (per second) in G-Sync are displayed when the GPU renders them. Compared to normal 60Hz monitor displaying each frame between 0 to 1/60th of a second later, or with image tear. G-Sync will be "butter" smooth as your 770 GTX cranks out 60-70 frames each second.

I want a 24" 16:10 IPS with G-Sync!!!
 

raknarius

n00b
Joined
Dec 29, 2013
Messages
29
ok after doing a lot of reading heres what I got so far for 60fps gaming


Fast response time such as 1ms Big help with motion blurr and input lag

120/144hz refresh rate Some help, in smoothness but may not be worth it at 60fps

lightboost Completely useless at 60fps non 3d games

gsync Big help for variable frame rates below monitors refresh rate (but effectively turns 144hz monitor to 60hz monitor at 60fps)



so me buying 144hz and gsync is pretty much a waste for 60fps gaming, as is lightboost, but 1ms is still worth my gaming money.



what do you think?
 

IdiotInCharge

NVIDIA SHILL
Joined
Jun 13, 2003
Messages
14,679
G-Sync will still run at "144Hz" (on the Asus monitor) even if you're only getting 60FPS, and it will still make a huge difference.
 

raknarius

n00b
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Dec 29, 2013
Messages
29
really I thought gsync forced the monitor to run at 60hz if your 60fps?? can anyone confirm this
 

IdiotInCharge

NVIDIA SHILL
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Jun 13, 2003
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14,679
really I thought gsync forced the monitor to run at 60hz if your 60fps?? can anyone confirm this

I put the refresh rate in quotes because it no longer really applies; the monitor will now update as fast as every 1/144th of a second whenever a frame is ready, instead of taking 1/60th of a second.
 

Nenu

[H]ardened
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Apr 28, 2007
Messages
20,187
Think of it this way.
On a normal 60Hz monitor, when your framerate is under 60fps, when a frame is ready it will not always match up with when the monitor is ready to display, the gfx card has to wait until the monitor is ready before sending the next frame, making for jerky movement.
You can alleviate this by turning off vsync but then you get tearing.

GSync will give you smooth video below 60Hz without tearing.
No matter what framerate you have (almost), it will look smooth.
The monitor runs at the framerate given out by the gfx card.
The slight advantage a 144Hz display gives is a tiny bit less lag.

Its the low framerate scenario where it is most useful, its very strange that they havent made it available on 60Hz displays as they would sell a LOT more and it could find its way into TVs.
But I suppose they couldnt sell the kits for £200 if it was available inside cheaper monitors than 144Hz.
Typical scam.
 

IdiotInCharge

NVIDIA SHILL
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Jun 13, 2003
Messages
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...mostly correct stuff cut...
Its the low framerate scenario where it is most useful, its very strange that they havent made it available on 60Hz displays as they would sell a LOT more and it could find its way into TVs.
But I suppose they couldnt sell the kits for £200 if it was available inside cheaper monitors than 144Hz.
Typical scam.

Remember that Nvidia is the only one doing this- and they don't make monitors. They had to convince other companies to work with them to even get a product out there, and then they had to sell the idea.

TVs won't benefit nearly as much for pre-rendered content like video; consoles could sure use it, though, if there was a simple way to make that happen.

On the PC side, expect that $200/£200 cost to drop precipitiously as G-Sync goes through hardware iterations. In final form, i.e. with a dedicated ASIC, a monitor with G-Sync shouldn't cost more than a few dollars/pounds over a base display.
 

Rendus

n00b
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Jul 24, 2005
Messages
54
You're thinking about this the wrong way. Instead, look at it like this:

Refresh rates no longer exist. They're no longer a factor. You are never stuck waiting for the next refresh interval to have your frame delivered, you're never stuck losing potential frames because you missed a refresh interval, you never experience tearing, you never have to enable vsync, you never have to enable double/triple buffering. The instant your next video frame is available, it's delivered and displayed - limited only by the physical characteristics of your monitor.
 

IdiotInCharge

NVIDIA SHILL
Joined
Jun 13, 2003
Messages
14,679
...limited only by the physical characteristics of your monitor.

...which is determined by the monitor's inherent 'refresh rate'. Assuming no fiddling, a 144Hz monitor will be capable of updating up to every 1/144th of a second, a 60Hz monitor every 1/60th of a second, and so on, but we do hope that there is fiddling. No reason not to push things where possible, like the Korean guys do with their 120Hz IPS/VA 1440p monitors.
 
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