Backup Solution and File Server

jlbenedict

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And on the topic of availability "this".. and SHR "that".. and redundancy "this".. one very important thing you should do is put your NAS on a battery backup..(of course in addition to proper backup strategy)..

Sudden power outages are probably one of the biggest reasons of data loss... so many bad things happen when power is shut off on a whim lol
 

Keljian

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The key word there is irreplaceable.
I agree with this... you see so many newbie tech "gurus" over in Reddit.. and they'll be on the hype train of running Plex, Docker, and VM's.. all on the NAS.. and then return complaining of issues..

a NAS is a NAS.. "Network Attached Storage".. it's not a server.. YES.. I get it... the specs one some of these new NAS's are nice as F and probably technically can handle running some "server" type applications, as they are nothing more than x86_64 computers.. but, asking these NAS appliances to do more than what they are intended for is asking for trouble

I don’t have any issue with Plex, that is pretty standard these days. It’s when you run lots of other software in dockers and vms and use it for routing and mail and other things.. it _can_ do these things, but chance of issues goes up substantially.
 

SamirD

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yeah >1tb drives are used for storage.. I meant irreplaceable storage - stuff like family photos..
I think even then you'd be surprised. I know I've got over 1TB for sure, and I don't even have that much media like others do.
 

SamirD

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I agree with this... you see so many newbie tech "gurus" over in Reddit.. and they'll be on the hype train of running Plex, Docker, and VM's.. all on the NAS.. and then return complaining of issues..

a NAS is a NAS.. "Network Attached Storage".. it's not a server.. YES.. I get it... the specs one some of these new NAS's are nice as F and probably technically can handle running some "server" type applications, as they are nothing more than x86_64 computers.. but, asking these NAS appliances to do more than what they are intended for is asking for trouble
Dead on. There is a real benefit from having distributed devices doing individual things--no single point of failure. And the complexity of running everything on one also makes it so one thing can break another, especially in today's ever changing software. I prefer dedicated machines to dedicated tasks. I even take that philosophy to the desktop level where critical tasks are only done by one machine (and its backups) and that's it. Sure makes life easier when something goes wrong. :)
 

D-EJ915

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With synology you can get an iosafe version of them as your backup target if you want some more physical resilience since they are just a synology in a ceramic container.
 

SamirD

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With synology you can get an iosafe version of them as your backup target if you want some more physical resilience since they are just a synology in a ceramic container.
Interesting. I didn't know iosafe made nas units. Not cost effective or a guarantee against disaster compared to more backups, but an interesting device for certain use cases.
 

Gamma_Ray

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I'd argue that the majority of home users don't have 1TB or more of data that is irreplaceable. 3-2-1 still stands, 3 copies, 2 on site, 1 offsite.

example

2 on site : Nas -> PC hard drive or USB hard drive (not ssd)
1 offsite : Hyperbackup -> Backblaze/Wasabi/Syno C2/google drive etc etc.
Thanks. Why not external SSD?
 

Keljian

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I think today's ssds are probably on par with hard drives that also need regularly operation to be reliable.
I have had 20 year old drives sitting on the shelf fire up perfectly fine. The only mechanical drives I would be concerned about these days are the helium filled ones.

Once the helium leaks out, heat/friction go up a lot, and they will probably die quickly.
 

SamirD

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I have had 20 year old drives sitting on the shelf fire up perfectly fine. The only mechanical drives I would be concerned about these days are the helium filled ones.

Once the helium leaks out, heat/friction go up a lot, and they will probably die quickly.
Most of the drives that I've let sit are only good for a few reads or a few months and then they'll start having issues reading the data. Hard drives are also not meant to sit for long periods of time without being powered on, which seems being on 24x7 their preferred path to long life as the drives in the hard drive poh thread show.
 

Keljian

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Most of the drives that I've let sit are only good for a few reads or a few months and then they'll start having issues reading the data. Hard drives are also not meant to sit for long periods of time without being powered on, which seems being on 24x7 their preferred path to long life as the drives in the hard drive poh thread show.
Interesting, I have a 1.5tb WD green that I fire up once a year that seems to be in good stead overall.. maybe I'm just lucky
 

Gamma_Ray

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And on the topic of availability "this".. and SHR "that".. and redundancy "this".. one very important thing you should do is put your NAS on a battery backup..(of course in addition to proper backup strategy)..

Sudden power outages are probably one of the biggest reasons of data loss... so many bad things happen when power is shut off on a whim lol
Battery backup as in a UPS?
 

Keljian

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A UPS for a nas doesn’t need to be huge, unless the nas is huge. It needs to keep the device running for 5-8 minutes to allow the device to shut down.
 

SamirD

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A UPS for a nas doesn’t need to be huge, unless the nas is huge. It needs to keep the device running for 5-8 minutes to allow the device to shut down.
And more importantly needs to interface properly to the nas os...or it's just going to delay shutting off without a warning.

This being said though, I've run most of my units without a UPS and they're fine after a power outage even without a shutdown. Still a good idea to shut it down and reboot it if you did have a power outage without a chance for it to shutdown properly.
 

Keljian

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And more importantly needs to interface properly to the nas os...or it's just going to delay shutting off without a warning.

This being said though, I've run most of my units without a UPS and they're fine after a power outage even without a shutdown. Still a good idea to shut it down and reboot it if you did have a power outage without a chance for it to shutdown properly.
If the Nas has any form of SSD cache, there is a large risk of problems if you randomly shut down the device rather than have a graceful shutdown.
 

SamirD

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If the Nas has any form of SSD cache, there is a large risk of problems if you randomly shut down the device rather than have a graceful shutdown.
Good point depending on if the ssd has nv flash and/or a capacitor.
 

SamirD

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Even if so, it’s the safe option
True, but if it was necessary to keep the unit from failing, then the manufacturer would require it. While not optimal, I'm sure there are mechanisms for recovery from power failure, although like you said some ssd cache data could be lost.
 
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