12v rail hits 11.36v at heavy gaming load

CleanSlate

Supreme [H]ardness
Joined
Mar 28, 2003
Messages
5,244
Source is software: HWMonitor

I'm guessing this PSU is bad, correct?

I can't imagine it being good at that level, even if software is kind of inaccurate. Bios shows similar reading at idle as HWMonitor of ~11.7v.

Curious what the [H]orde thinks.
 

Tsumi

[H]F Junkie
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Mar 18, 2010
Messages
13,538
HWMonitor and any software/bios readings are inaccurate. You need a DMM to accurately measure voltage.
 

SonDa5

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Aug 20, 2008
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7,430
HWMonitor and any software/bios readings are inaccurate. You need a DMM to accurately measure voltage.



Voltage sensors may also be in locations where the voltage coming from the PSU may be effected by MB and hardware electrical components that may effect the sensor voltage reading.

If you measure the voltage with a DMM coming sraight from the PSU cables connectors while system is under load you can see the voltage measurements directly related to psu voltage while selecting certain hot spots on a mb voltage will be different because of how the electrical components effect the voltage of the PSU.

It's easy to think a PSU is going bad by just relying on the sensor readings. Could be a MBhardware that isn't conducting electricity from PSU well.


My last PSU was Seasonic X760 and it had strong 12v readings on HDWinfo64 with low 3v readings.

My new Seasonic Platinum 860 has lower 12v readings but higher 3v readings on the HWinfo64 sensor readings.


With a DMM directly at he point of connection of the PSU cables under load my voltages from the Platinum 860 are rock solid right where they should be.

Strange how voltage sensors vary from psu connection point and sensor reading.
 
Last edited:

CleanSlate

Supreme [H]ardness
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Mar 28, 2003
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5,244
Theoretically, what would be the problems occuring from a 12v and 3.3v line being low volted?
 

SonDa5

Supreme [H]ardness
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Theoretically, what would be the problems occuring from a 12v and 3.3v line being low volted?

Either the PSU is not supplying the rated voltage to begin with or there is a voltage drop going on.

"Kirchhoff's circuit laws states that in any circuit, the sum of the voltage drops across each component of the circuit is equal to the supply voltage."
 

Direfox

[H]ard|Gawd
Joined
Oct 24, 2004
Messages
1,945
What are your system specs? And +1 to software monitoring being very inaccurate. It doesn't mean there ISN'T a problem with your PSU, especially if you are getting lockups. There can be lots of other reasons for that though, from driver issues to overheating, etc.
 

larrymoencurly

[H]ard|Gawd
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Jul 18, 2002
Messages
1,635
I don't trust monitoring software, either, but it's usually OK for reporting voltage differences, as opposed to absolute voltages, so what are all the voltage readings during idle, and what are they during gaming?
 

NoxTek

The Geek Redneck
Joined
May 27, 2002
Messages
9,300
God DAMMIT people... do not not NOT trust voltage reading from software. ANY software... that includes the system BIOS. This especially goes for PSU voltages (+12v, +5v)... they aren't even remotely accurately reported by ANY motherboard.

Honestly you would think think would be common knowledge by now...

You want to measure your +12v? Get a halfway decent multimeter, set it to measure DC voltage in the appropriate range, plug the red lead into one of the YELLOW wires off a 4-pin molex from your PSU, and either plug the black lead into a black wire off a 4-pin molex or ground it to your chassis somewhere. Most multimeter leads will fit perfectly into the 'holes' on a female 4-pin molex. You can now measure your 12v under desktop use and under heavy load. If you have a true multi-rail PSU then rinse and repeat for each rail (they are usually color coded)
 
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